yclept djinnj
Twins' Ski Cap 
18th-Aug-2006 06:40 pm
knit snitch
Can I say how much I despise duplicate stitch? Well I do. I really really do.

It's a rough pattern. I didn't have the right weight yarn so I worked it up in WORSTED WEIGHT yarn on US#2/2.75mm needles. Don't ever say I don't love fandom, 'cause I'll have to stab you with my little, little needles.

I also ripped the crown 7 times because I didn't like the shape, and one last time because I'd had a sudden realization about the placement of the white diamonds. The crown is not ideal, I merely got fed up with ripping it out. I've got notes to improving its shape at the end, however.




Reference pics:



This pattern requires 112st for the design to fit, so the gauge has to be in the correct range. Build in about 3" negative ease for the best fit, and work in WOOL. Seriously, there's a bit of finagling the crown of the hat which requires blocking. Look at the last ref pic if you don't believe me. Gauge: about 5.7st/in; 8r/in blocked, over stockinette. It just looks big because the styrofoam head is too small.

This pattern also requires DK weight yarn on whatever needle size to get gauge, probably a US#5 or so. I only had worsted, and let me tell you it was not fun. Also, using worsted means that the DS looks a bit more prominent than normal.

The first bit is the pattern as I worked it. The second bit is a cheat for folks who don't like purling. The third bit is a slightly modified crown which I think would work better. The last bit is the chart for the duplicate stitch. Some of the colorwork can be done by stranding, but there would be long floats on some rows even then.

Pattern as worked
Long tail cast on 112 and join in round.
r1: knit
r2: knit
r3: purl
Mark next row as where the cuff motif begins.
Continue purling and work until piece is 3.5" long from cast-on edge
next row: knit
Work until stockinette portion is 4.5" long. Mark the row at the 1.5" mark; that will be where the bottom of wave motif will be. Change color to blue and work 9r
Begin decreases. All unmentioned rows are knit without decreasing. (k2tog can be used instead of ssk, it just won't look as neat.)
dec r1: [k, ssk, k9, k2tog]x8
dec r4: Change color to cream - [k, ssk, k7, k2tog]x8
dec r7: [k, ssk, k5, k2tog]x8
dec r10: [k, ssk, k3, k2tog]x8
dec r13: [k, ssk, k1, k2tog]x8
dec r16: [k1, sl2 knitwise, k1, psso]x8
work last 2 rows and then run tail through loops, pull closed leaving a small hole and weave in end.

Wash and block flat, and stretch the white portion of the crown of the hat up so that it lies flat. Also, try and pull on it so the blue stripe curves up a bit between the decreases (again, as seen in the last ref pic).

Make the pompom: Holding 2 strands of cream with one strand of blue, wrap the yarn around a 1.5" wide piece of cardboard. Wrap the yarn about 100-120 times (for worsted weight, I'd do about 130-160x for DK). Cut the end. Slip a threaded yarn needle between the cardboard and the yarn on one edge and bundle the strands closely together. Tie it as tightly and firmly as possible. Cut the yarn along the opposite edge. Trim and then sew directly to the blocked hat.

Anti-purling cheat: This reduces the purling to 2 rows. The cast on edge will look slightly different, but one can't have everything. And yes, the cheat could be worked twice eliminating all the purling, but it will be more noticeable on the edge which is why I don't recommend it.

Long tail cast on 112 and join in round.
r1: purl
r2: purl
r3: knit
Mark next row as where the cuff motif begins.
Continue knitting and work until piece is 3.5" long from cast-on edge
next row: turn the piece inside out so the purl side is facing. Yarn over and knit until there is one stitch left in the row. Knit the last stitch together with the yarn over and continue in stockinette for 4.5" as above.


Crown decrease modification: All this is, is adding a row between decreases; it starts at the same place.
Work until stockinette portion is 4.5" long. Mark the row at the 1.5" mark; that will be where the bottom of wave motif will be. Change color to blue and work 9r
Begin decreases. All unmentioned rows are knit without decreasing. (k2tog can be used instead of ssk, it just won't look as neat.)
dec r1: [k1, ssk, k9, k2tog]x8
r4: Change color to cream
dec r5: [k1, ssk, k7, k2tog]x8
dec r9: [k1, ssk, k5, k2tog]x8
dec r13: [k1, ssk, k3, k2tog]x8
dec r17: [k1, ssk, k1, k2tog]x8
dec r21: [k1, sl2 knitwise, k1, psso]x8
work last 3 rows and then run tail through loops, pull tight and weave in end. Leave a tail at least 4" long for attaching the pompom. There will be a small hole which will be covered up by the pompom. Or work another row of decreases (k2tog to end) and then finish as stated.


Chart for duplicate stitch: The middle band of the diamond/lozenge and the white diamonds on the blue field can be worked in stranded colorwork if you're willing to tack down the long floats on some of the rows. If I were to do this again, I'd probably do that as it's a lot less tedious. If stranding, the first chart on the bottom of the graph can be used and the bar in the lozenge can be knit in. Or The second chart can be used and the bar can be embroidered. Due to the heaviness of the worsted weight yarn I used, I couldn't leave it 2r tall, as it wasn't enough room for the bar, even embroidering it.

The green asterisk indicates the start of the row in relation to the written instructions. You'll note that this places the "rib" of the decreases in the center of the diamonds (the decreases are also noted in the chart) as is clear from the last reference pic.
Comments 
19th-Aug-2006 12:38 am (UTC)
Once again, I bow down before your amazing ability to recreate bits of fandom. And that you did it with US#2 needles makes it even more wondrous. I can only imagine how your hands felt at the end of it!

A thundrous round of applaus for your patience and perserverence!
19th-Aug-2006 04:04 am (UTC)
:D
19th-Aug-2006 02:12 pm (UTC)
I dug out my old issues of Threads and found an article on knitting with sewing patterns.

Of course, knitting has advanced seriously since the early '90s, so it might not be helpful to you. I was thinking of your quest to produce a knitted chinese court gown. Patterns to sew said must exist. A sewing pattern might provide helpful clues on shaping for the right hang.

Of course, now that I've said all this, you can probably figure out the process for yourself.
19th-Aug-2006 03:35 pm (UTC)
I don't have a pattern, but I do have a photo from Maylith of a large piece of fabric. It shows the gown as embroidered from one piece of silk so all which would need to be sewn are the arm/side seams and the hems around the keyhole neck and such. The piece she has, which she's got provenance for from about the Boxer Rebellion, doesn't seem to have a place to cut for an opening, which makes me wonder a little if it's a display piece, but it's awfully big if it is so.

But really, I'm more concerned with issues of drape and structural stability, does the article expound on that at all? If so, I'd love to take a look at it.
20th-Aug-2006 10:44 am (UTC)
The article does address drape and structural stability. There are also instructions for measuring and adapting sewing patterns, choosing sizes for sewing patterns, figuring in "ease" and charting the knit pattern.

The article also discusses cutting and sewing knit fabrics, but you know how to steek so that's not a real issue for you. It's for machine knit fabrics. Don't you have a knitting machine?

I also found a tutorial on charting original lace designs and another on different styles of holding and working with knitting needles. These are obviously not for you, as such, but rather for a time when you might want to teach something on the topic.

Actually, you might find it interesting to come by and look at my old issues of Threads. Because I couldn't know what might spark something useful or interesting in your mind, I can't be sure what you'd like to read.
19th-Aug-2006 02:52 pm (UTC)
*appluads* This is fantastic! And quick too, wow!
19th-Aug-2006 03:36 pm (UTC)
:D

Would've been quicker if I'd had the right yarn and not had to rip the crown so often. And I must say that that's one reason I don't like duplicate stitch. All that stuff still to do when the knitting's done!
9th-Sep-2006 02:07 pm (UTC)
amazing.
This page was loaded Nov 24th 2014, 11:54 am GMT.